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feet!

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Are you more of a ‘pronator or supinator’? Actually we need to do both. Pronation is a good thing as is supination. As the foot is loaded in mid stance, the rear foot twists on the forefoot and allows the arch to drop, pronation. This is our natural shock absorber as 2 and a half times our body weight creates a loaded force through our body.

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Illustrations from

‘Trail guide to the body’ Andrew Neil
‘Anatomy for runners’ Jay Dicharry

“During pronation support from the big toe actively stabilises the twisting of the rear foot on forefoot.”

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During pronation support from the big toe actively stabilises the twisting of the rear foot on forefoot.

During supination the big toe locks the foot out to create a rigid lever for push off.
Supinators stay on the outside of the foot keeping the arch overly stiff which passes increased stress up the shin.
Late Supinators stay in the shock absorbing phaze too long.
The big toe provides 80 to 85% of primary support. But to provide this support it has to be on the ground. Exercises for the Flexor hallicus brevis can help build up strength in the big toe.

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What happens next?

Some people will be prescribed orthotics to help with late supination from a podiatrist and in many cases these can really help. However sometimes by mobilising and strengthening hip abductors and encouraging the foot by exercises to encoursge pronation or supination, orthotics can be avoided. Or at the very least the amount of support needed can be reduced.
Many over use injuries in runners can be avoided by good pelvic function and core stability. Plus look after your feet they take a lot of hammering and have been stuffed into shoes with narrow toe boxes. Let them out for a break…exercise your toes. Remind them how important they are.
Illustrations from
‘Trail guide to the body’ Andrew Neil
‘Anatomy for runners’ Jay Dicharry

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Illustrations from
‘Trail guide to the body’ Andrew Neil
‘Anatomy for runners’ Jay Dicharry

Message The Hayrunner to find out more, and to book a Pelvic Biomechanics Screening.

 

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